Why did the girl attorney stop dating the boy attorney

The student answers 5 5 5=15, but is marked incorrect.Instead, the teacher writes that the correct answer should have been 3 3 3 3 3=15.However, when it comes to single multiplication problems, it doesn't matter which way the problem is read. implement national Common Core learning standards, parents trying to help their kids with math homework say that adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing has become as complicated as calculus.Business Insider reports that defenders of Common Core say the grading is important, since reading questions this way will help students better understand multi-variable calculus - a class that's at least nine years away for third-graders still learning to count in their head instead of on their hands. The standards for elementary math emphasize that kids should not only be able to solve arithmetic problems using the tried-and-true methods their parents learned, but understand how numbers relate to each other.'Part of what we are trying to teach children is to become problem solvers and thinkers,' said Diane Briars, president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.The student draws six rows of four and is again marked wrong, with the teacher drawing four rows of six as the correct answer.These questions were marked wrong because children today are taught to read a question like 4x6 as four groups of six - not six groups of four.Such a legal arrangement is called a stay of adjudication.

So it pains me to no end to see my smart, educated, lovely female friends remain single, alone and lonely in spite of their best efforts. Surely there is something wrong with the world if they remain single for so long.

The above two questions were marked wrong because children are taught to read multiplication questions as the first number, grouped in the amount of the second number.

For example, 5x3 would be five groups of three The first question asks the student to use repeated addition to solve the question 5x3.

That's what compelled me to write What compels me to write this article today is a recent trip to the Harvard-Yale Game festivities, reminding me of how smart, educated women routinely sabotage their own chances for romantic fulfillment.

Because, as fabulous as these ladies are, all of their failed relationships have one thing in common: themselves.