Sociology dating curve

Absolute dating techniques were not available to him (radiocarbon dating wasn't invented until the 1940s); and since they were separately excavated graves, stratigraphy was no use either.Petrie knew that styles of pottery seemed to come and go over time--in his case, he noted that some ceramic urns from the graves had handles and others had just stylized ridges in the same location on similarly shaped urns. With successive groups of consumers adopting the new technology (shown in blue), its market share (yellow) will eventually reach the saturation level.In mathematics, the yellow curve is known as the logistic function. Diffusion of innovations is a theory that seeks to explain how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread.A team led by Elizabeth Bruch, a sociologist at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, tapped into this torrent of dating data.Because of a nondisclosure agreement, the researchers can't reveal the exact source of their subjects, describing it only as an "established, marriage-oriented, subscription-based dating site" from which they randomly selected 1855 people, all based in New York City.Those 30 million people have generated billions of pieces of data.And because most dating sites ask users to give consent for their data to be used for research purposes, this online courting has played out like an enormous social science experiment, recording people's moment-by-moment interactions and judgments.

I read dozens of studies about love, how people connect and why they do or don’t stay together.

Within the rate of adoption, there is a point at which an innovation reaches critical mass.

The categories of adopters are innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards.

Diffusion manifests itself in different ways and is highly subject to the type of adopters and innovation-decision process.

The criterion for the adopter categorization is innovativeness, defined as the degree to which an individual adopts a new idea.