Dating scene in san francisco ca

Some consider it to include Duboce Triangle and Dolores Heights, which both have a strong LGBT presence.

Castro Street, which originates a few blocks north at the intersection of Divisadero and Waller Streets, runs south through Noe Valley, crossing the 24th Street business district and ending as a continuous street a few blocks farther south as it moves toward the Glen Park neighborhood.

With just 49 modern rooms, this property boasts a chic Pacific Heights location, just minutes from the Presidio, away from the heart of the city's Lombard Street hubbub.

As part of the boutique Joie de Vivre Hospitality chain, expect top amenities like in-room Blu-Ray and CD players, and thoughtful touches like afternoon cookies and lemonade in the lobby.

The Fillmore Theatre is San Francisco's historic music venue that represented the pinnacle of creative music-making in the late 1960s - and still introduces audiences to eclectic musical combinations.

The largest urban centre west of the Mississippi, this newly redeveloped shopping centre offers an array of boutiques, including Bloomingdale’s, Nordstrom, Juicy Couture, Simayof, Ann Taylor and BCBG.

6238, 6244, 6291, and 8173 written off due to a fire, and 5454, 6259, and 8319 written off due to an accident.

^8448 Wi-Fi equipped from 2008 to 2009, the "Connected" bus.

It survived the 1906 earthquake and fire which destroyed a large portion of San Francisco.

It reappears in several discontinuous sections before ultimately terminating at Chenery Street, in the heart of Glen Park.

Castro Street was named for José Castro (1808–1860), a Californian leader of Mexican opposition to U. rule in California in the 19th century, and alcalde of Alta California from 1835 to 1836.

The 30- and 40-ft diesel/hybrid buses are numbered in the 8000 series, the 60-ft articulated diesel/hybrid buses in the 6000 series, the 40-ft trolleybuses in the 5000 series, the 60-ft articulated trolleybuses in the 7000 series, and the streetcars in the 1000 series.

Muni is in the process of replacing its motor coach fleet - the first of which was procured in 1915Kirkland: 1AX (Some), 1BX (Some), 10, 12, 19, 28, 28R, 30X (Only a few), 31AX, 31BX, 38AX, 38BX, 43, 47, 76X, Cable Car Shuttle (Sometimes), F (Sometimes) Woods: 2, 5 (Weekdays 7AM-7PM; Sometimes), 6 (Some), 7 (Sometimes), 9 (Sometimes), 9R (Sometimes), 18, 27, 29 (Sometimes), 44, 48 (Sometimes), 54 (Sometimes), 57 (Sometimes), 81X, 82X, 90, 91 (All Woods Division routes use these buses as reserve fleets)8102, 8104-8105, 8107, 8114-8115, 8117, 8119-8120, 8125, 8127, 8135-8136, 8138, 8144-8146, 8149, 8152-8153, 8156-8158, 8163, 8171-8172, 8175, 8178, 8181, 8184, 8189, 8192, 8195, 8199, 8202-8203, 8205-8206, 8210-8213, 8217-8218, 8221-8222, 8225-8227, 8231, 8302-8304, 8306-8308, 8311, 8313, 8315-8316, 8320, 8322, 8325-8326, 8329-8330, 8334, 8338, 8342, 8345, 8347-8349, 8352-8353, 8356, 8361, 8368-8369, 8371♦1AX (Some), 1BX (Some), 2 (Sometimes), 5 (Weekdays 7AM-7PM; Sometimes), 6 (Some), 7, 7R, 7X, 9, 9R, 18, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31AX, 31BX, 44, 48, 54, 57 (Sometimes), 67 (Sometimes), 81X, 82X, 90, 91, F (Sometimes)Woods: 2 (Some), 5 (Weekdays 7am-7pm), 6 (Temporarily), 7, 7R, 7X, 9, 9R, 18, 23, 25, 27, 28 (Some), 28R (Some), 29, 44, 48 (Some), 52 (Sometimes), 54, 55, 57 (Mostly), 66 (Sometimes), 67 (Sometimes), 81X, 82X, 88, 90, 91, F (Sometimes), L Owl, N Owl, NX Kirkland: 1AX (Some), 1BX (Some), 10 (Some), 12 (Sometimes), 19 (Some), 28, 28R, 30X (Only a few), 31AX, 31BX, 38AX, 38BX, 43 (Sometimes), 47 (Some), 76X, Cable Car Shuttle (Sometimes), F (Sometimes) 8173, and 8319 retired.